Mayor Bill de Blasio insisted Thursday that he sees “eye to eye” on most issues with Democratic mayoral nominee Eric Adams, even as the Brooklyn borough president has called city “out of control” and decried city business policies.

“The borough president and I, we have a relationship that goes back decades,” de Blasio said during his press conference, when asked about Adams’ recent habit of painting an unflattering picture of the Big Apple. “We see eye to eye on a wide range of issues, and I really think he’s the right person for this moment in history to take us to the next level.”

The mayor brushed aside Adam’s recent criticism of the city’s direction, noting he and Adams often align on issues, particularly criminal justice.

“I haven’t seen every quote, but I can tell you, we’ve talked plenty of times about that, there are a lot of things we want to see the government do better, he and I share that view,” he said. “We definitely want to see us get back to the kind of public safety we had pre-pandemic. He was often someone I worked with closely on those neighborhood policing efforts.”

“I think there’s a lot of common ground,” the mayor added. “There’s problems, and like any candidate, he is talking about problems that have to be addressed, but I have a lot of confidence in his visions and I have a lot of confidence we’ll work well together to get things done.”

Mayor Bill de Blasio touted that he and Democratic mayoral nominee Eric Adams see “eye to eye” on most issues.
Erik Pendzich/Shutterstock

De Blasio will serve as an advisor to Adams, if the heavily favored NYPD-cop-turned-politician wins the November general election and takes office in January, the New York Times reported in July.

But during his mayoral primary campaign and the months following his victory, Adams has repeatedly decried what he views as a recent decline in quality of life, inducing lawlessness, and rise in “disorder.”

“Public safety is not only actual, it’s perceived,” the mayoral contender said Wednesday on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.” “And so we have to deal with the perception of fear that has really engulfed our city, and our city’s out of control.

Adams has said that New York's quality of life has gone downhill and that there has been a rise in chaos under de Blasio.
Adams has said that New York’s quality of life has gone downhill and that there has been a rise in chaos under de Blasio.
Paul Martinka

“We must move right away to change the ecosystem of public safety.”

In addition, Adams has described city government as an “enemy’ of business, and vowed to improve City Hall’s frosty relationship with deep-pocketed New Yorkers.

“Right now, no one wants to do business in the city,” Adams said last week on Bloomberg Radio. “We have been defined as a business-enemy city instead of a business-friendly city.”

Adam's has also promised to make New York City more "pro-business" to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.
Adam’s has also promised to make New York City more “pro-business” to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.
AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

“New York will no longer be anti-business,” Adams declared on Sept. 13.

“This is going to be a place where we welcome business and not turn into the dysfunctional city that we have been for so many years.”

But he’s also indicated he won’t clean house from city government, despite painting a grim picture of numerous facets of the five boroughs. Adams recently spoke favorably of homeless services head Steve Banks, hinting in July that the longtime public servant could keep his job while he’s in charge.

Eric Adams has promised to work with local police departments to help lower the number of violent crimes.
Eric Adams has promised to work with local police departments to help lower the number of violent crimes.
Paul Martinka

And he’s stopped short of blaming de Blasio, who has been in charge of city government for nearly eight years, for many of the problems he’s continuously highlighted in recent months.

Asked by The Post what the current mayor could and should have done differently vis-à-vis the city government’s supposedly anti-business approach, Adams denied that de Blasio was to blame for the Big Apple’s commercial shortcomings.

“I don’t think it started under Mayor de Blasio,” he said during an unrelated event Monday. “I believe that we have witnessed a city that really — we have become too expensive, too bureaucratic and too difficult to do business in and it didn’t start with Mayor de Blasio.”

mm

By James Carter

A Senior writer & Editor, James is a postgraduate in biotechnology and has an immense interest in following news developments. Quiet by nature, he is an avid Lacrosse player. He is responsible for handling the office staff writers and providing them with the latest updates happenings in the world. He writes for almost all sections of Editorials 24.